Best article you ever wrote. Thank you. White Women: We Are Amy Cooper

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White Women: We Are Amy Cooper

Inspiring the Antiracist Generation
59 articles 


Amy Cooper is a mirror all white women need to look at and grow from.We must not turn away and pretend we didn’t see her, nor pretend she doesn’t live inside of us. 


Our transformation is long overdue. It begins by seeing ourselves clearly, the way others do.

If white women don't want to be held to account for white women's behavior, we must change our behavior. Those of us who are not the white women raising monsters, voting for monsters, and behaving like monsters have a responsibility to reach and teach those who are. We must become role models to other white women and our children of how to be white women without causing harm.

Around 2014, watching #BlackLivesMatter activists stand up to tear gas in Ferguson inspired me to stand up for Black lives, and for myself. I began changing my beliefs and behaviors, and left my husband. My shock when Darren Wilson wasn’t indicted for killing Mike Brown coupled with listening to Black women’s stories of the nonstop abuse they received at work, a lot of it coming from women who look like me, made me begin educating white people how to change.

It hasn’t been easy- I was fired, my income plummeted, and I lost some relationships. But the more I work to heal myself, unlearn my racism, slay my inner patriarch, heal my relationships with people of color, follow women of color, and engage in activism, the better I feel.

You may be thinking: “I’m not Amy Cooper. I don’t have any part in this.” Part of white privilege is feeling entitled to be perceived as an individual and not as a representative of our entire race. Another part of white privilege is not to feel responsible for the behavior of other white people.

People of color never get those privileges. They are always perceived as representatives of their entire group. Many of them feel responsible for the behavior of other people of their race. 

I grew up learning to perform white womanhood the way the patriarchy likes it, rewarded with tiny amounts of power for policing others’ behavior, pleasing the powerful, and not stepping out of line. I believed my family had what we had because we worked hard and if others would only choose to work hard, they would also be fine. I worked hard, every day of my life. But no matter how hard I ran in the wheel, success always remained out of reach in a system designed by powerful wealthy white men to accumulate more wealth and power. Many of us are still trying, that’s why we’re so exhausted, angry, and looking for someone to blame. 

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White women, we may not realize it, but, as Torraine Walker said, we “have more privilege than any other group in America.” Black and Indigenous People of Color carry intergenerational trauma about catering to us, because an upset white woman caused their families' death and devastation.

Yet wherever we go, we are perceived as innocent and harmless. When I get pulled over, the officer says “ma’am your taillight is broken, you need to get that fixed.” I never fear for my life. I don’t have to explain to my children how to best protect themselves from police. 

I do have to explain to my children how best to protect themselves from violent white men who shoot up schools, music festivals, churches. Who rape women with impunity. 

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Who raised these men? We did.

White women, particularly those of us who are mothers, have been the glue holding violent white men in power since 1619, when the first ship of tobacco brides arrived at Jamestown. 

White women, we may not recognize it, but we have tremendous power. In 2016 we made up the largest group in the electorate, more than white men (33%) and Black and Latinx women and men combined (20%). Yet 53% of us chose pussygrabber in chief over one of our own. 

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White women, are we going to be Amy Cooper and her sister Karen?

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Or are we going to find our courage, transform ourselves, and stop upholding those who harm us and everyone else?

Who we choose to be is a matter of life and death for millions of people who don’t have the power and privilege we do-- including our own children. 

I hope we choose wisely.

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Karen Fleshman, Esq. She/ Her founded Racy Conversations in 2014 to inspire the antiracist generation. She is the author of White Women We Need to Talk: Doing Our Part to End Racism to be published by Sounds True in 2021 and of a 2018 open letter to white women, "No More Permit Patties."

 

Mental Health Awareness Month PTSD is real. Slavery 1950's America Just hear the stories of those willing to talk.

The Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 which changed the status of over 3.5 million enslaved African Americans in the South from slave to free, did not emancipate some hundreds who were slaves through to the 1960s.

This was revealed by historian and genealogist Antoinette Harrell who unearthed shocking stories of slaves in Southern states like Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Florida over hundred years after the Emancipation Proclamation.


She told Justin Fornal that her 1994 journey of historical truth revealed the stories of many 20th century slaves who came forth in New Orleans when they heard that she was using genealogy to connect the dots of a lost history.

She said a woman introduced her to about 20 people who had worked on the Waterford Plantation in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, as slaves until the 1960s.

“One way or another, they had become indebted to the plantation’s owner and were not allowed to leave the property … At the end of the harvest, when they tried to settle up with the owner, they were always told they didn’t make it into the black and to try again next year. Every passing year, the workers fell deeper and deeper in debt,” she said.

Many of them were afraid to share their stories as they believed they will be sent back to the plantation which isn’t even in operation. “People are afraid to share their stories, because in the South so many of the same white families who owned these plantations are still running local government and big businesses. They still hold the power.

“So the poor and disenfranchised really don’t have anywhere to share these injustices without fearing major repercussions. To most folks, it just isn’t worth the risk. So, sadly, most situations of this sort go unreported,” she told Justin Fornal and was published in art and culture magazine website Vice.

One of the 20th-century slaves was Mae Louise Walls Miller and she didn’t get her freedom until 1963. Her father, Cain Wall, lost his land by signing a contract he couldn’t read that enslaved his entire family.

They were not permitted to leave the land and the owners subjected them to beatings and rape. Mae and her mother were most times raped simultaneously alongside each other by white men when they go to the main house to work.

According to Harrell’s narration, Mae and her family did not know what was happening outside the land as they had no TV. Her father tried to flee the property, but was caught by other landowners who returned him to the farm where he was brutally beaten in front of his family.

When Harrell met Mae, her father was alive and he was 107 years old with a sharp memory. He beat Mae when she was 14 for attempting to flee the farm, an action whose consequence was beating of the entire family.

Mae, covered in blood, still run into the woods in the evening and hid in the bushes where a white family took her in and rescued the rest of her family later that night.

Harrell said the family suffered from PTSD as a result of their experiences. Mae died in 2014.

“I told you my story because I have no fear in my heart. What can any living person do to me? There is nothing that can be done to me that hasn’t already been done,” Mae told Harrell when they visited the property she and her family were held.

Antoinette Harrell believes “there are still African families who are tied to Southern farms in the most antebellum sense of speaking. If we don’t investigate and bring to light how slavery quietly continued, it could happen again.”

Original Article by Ismail Akwei

Ismail Akwei is an international journalist, communications and media consultant, editor, writer, human rights advocate, pan-Africanist, tech enthusiast, history fanatic and a lover of arts and culture. He has worked with multinational media companies across the continent and has over a decade's experience in journalism.

Air Force Thunderbirds’ First Black Female Officer is Captain Remoshay Nelson #shegetitdone

 

With the coronavirus pandemic taking over all aspects of our lives, the country has been using several methods to show our appreciation to front line healthcare workers and associates. The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds are doing their part by performing flyovers to honor these workers during the coronavirus pandemic.

According to NBC 4 Washington, one of the team’s newest members is a Howard University graduate and its first black female officer.

This year is Captain Remoshay Nelson’s first season with the squadron. The regular shows have temporarily been placed on hold due to the coronavirus pandemic, but the Thunderbirds have been conducting flyovers across D.C., Baltimore, and Atlanta to pay special tribute to people on the front lines battling the pandemic.

“I know a small percentage of African American officers, specifically female officers in the Air Force. So to be in a position that is visible, to show little girls that this is attainable, to let them know they can do anything they put their mind to, is an absolute honor,” Nelson tells NBC 4 Washington.

Nelson has spent eight years in the Air Force, serving mostly overseas. She says her best decision was the chance to attend Howard University.

“To be around people who look like me and instill a self-confidence in who I am, and walk into the world knowing where I come from and where my people come from, and where we can go, is invaluable,” Nelson said.

Nelson’s position is a highly selective one. She is only one of 12 Thunderbirds. Since the team’s inception in 1953, only 332 officers have made the cut.

“Even when people tell you no to your face, but your work shows where you should be, I think if you continue to work hard and go after what it is you want, you will achieve your dream.

“Where people can look up and have some type of hope during this time, to know we can get through this. The Thunderbirds are with them,” Nelson said.

Nelson feels that the grocery store clerks, those in fast-food service, and the sanitation workers who go to work every day should also be acknowledged.

“We have one life to live and so I want to do that by giving back and by showing people what is possible,” Nelson said. “Just to achieve as much as I can when I have the opportunity to do so.”

Source: blackenterprise.com

Nicole Malachowski and Micheal "Shegetitdone" Lane @WIMI 2019

Breaking Barriers: Conquering Self-Doubt & Cultural Paradigms By Nicole "FIFI" Malachowski First Female Thunderbird Pilot

People Facebook just changed the game. What does this mean to you? So is your worth based on the city you live in.

Be Comfortable being Uncomfortable. unknown photo 


Here’s the Facebook catch: employees will have to tell their boss if they move to a different location. According to CEO Mark Zuckerberg, those who flee to lower-cost cities “may have their compensation adjusted based on their new locations.” He ominously added, “We’ll adjust salary to your location at that point. There’ll be severe ramifications for people who are not honest about this.” It's becoming clear that the “gift” of remote work may be a wolf in sheep’s clothing. Let’s face facts, Zuckerburg and Dorsey didn’t become multimillionaires because they’re nice. They are sharp, aggressive, genius wolves dressed in T-shirts, jeans and hoodies. They know that a person can work from home in San Francisco, North Dakota, Iowa, Utah, England or India. It's been proven that the available technology, such as Zoom videos, Slack and other products, make it easy to work from anywhere in the world and seamlessly connect with co-workers and managers. Zuckerberg can now scout for talent all over the country and world. This could be the worst trend for workers, as CEOs arbitrage the best, cheapest job seekers globally. Facebook will source job applicants who possess all of the right skills and ...  Said Jack Kelly
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##duet with @wealth I made this weeks ago before ##coronavirus shut shit down ##michealuninterruptedpodcast ##fyp ##becomfortablebeinguncomfortable

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s Power Move May Be The Biggest Game Changer For The Job Market

Facebook has a history of either copying or acquiring their competitors. This isn’t meant to be a slight; it's smart. Facebook has the war chest, talent and billions of global visitors to its platforms. There’s no need for them to keep reinventing the wheel. 

It didn’t come as a surprise when Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg copied Jack Dorsey, the dual CEO of Twitter and Square. Dorsey previously announced that he’d allow his employees to continue working from home “forever.” Dorsey said, “We want employees to be able to work where they feel most creative and productive.”   

On the heels of Dorsey’s announcement, Facebook said this week that it would permit its employees to work remotely too. Zuckerberg isn't known for being warm and cuddly. He’s viewed as a brilliant and tough business person. He clearly sees the trend and benefits of allowing employees to work from home and jumped on the bandwagon. The massive, forced remote-work experiment made by major corporations, during the pandemic, proved a great success. The workers didn’t have to be subjected to long, time-wasting commutes. They were able to take care of and teach their children, as their schools closed, and available to help sick or needy family members.Companies recognize that their costs will appreciably drop if they’re no longer required to lease pricy real estate in big, overcrowded cities that have high tax rates. They also understand, from a public relations standpoint, that less people driving or taking busses to and from work cuts down on pollution and saves the environment. We’ve all seen by now the before Covid-19 and after photos of cities showing the improvement of the air quality. 

Zuckerberg anticipates that a large percentage of his people will work remotely and said, “We’re going to be the most forward-leaning company on remote work at our scale.” While this sounds noble and magnanimous, there’s an underlying threat to workers.

At first blush, Facebook, Twitter, Square and other employees who’ve been offered the chance to work remotely will be delighted that they don’t have to commute, deal with annoying co-workers, endless in-person meetings and their bosses glaring at them. 

Time to make use of all those extra rooms in the 90210 zip code. Million dollar listings
In our 20745 zip code, we sometimes had 5 to a room. The Apartment I grew up in.
Akron, OH 44320 you will never earn your worth in corporate America 36,223 median income.

Some will say that it's not worthwhile to live in San Francisco, Silicon Valley or other cities where rentals and houses cost a fortune. The taxes and cost of living are also too high. Many will leave the cities and move to places that offer more affordable housing, along with a better quality and higher standard of living. This can be boom for many suburbs and warm, sunny low-tax states and a detriment to the cities that throngs of people escape from.

Here’s the Facebook catch: employees will have to tell their boss if they move to a different location. According to Zuckerberg, those who flee to lower-cost cities “may have their compensation adjusted based on their new locations.” He ominously added, “We’ll adjust salary to your location at that point. There’ll be severe ramifications for people who are not honest about this.”

It's becoming clear that the “gift” of remote work may be a wolf in sheep’s clothing. Let’s face facts, Zuckerburg and Dorsey didn’t become multimillionaires because they’re nice. They are sharp, aggressive, genius wolves dressed in T-shirts, jeans and hoodies. They know that a person can work from home in San Francisco, North Dakota, Iowa, Utah, England or India. It's been proven that the available technology, such as Zoom videos, Slack and other products, make it easy to work from anywhere in the world and seamlessly connect with co-workers and managers. 

Zuckerberg can now scout for talent all over the country and world. This could be the worst trend for workers, as CEOs arbitrage the best, cheapest job seekers globally. Facebook will source job applicants who possess all of the right skills and experience and live in lower-cost places and pay them less money then they’d receive working in San Francisco. Dorsey was upfront about this stating, “We can get talent anywhere. There’s a lot of folks out there that do not want to move to San Francisco. They feel comfortable working in a much smaller office or just home.”

This will cause a ripple of serious repercussions. Salaries for workers in San Francisco and other large cities may fall due to the introduction of job seekers that weren’t previously considered. Compensation may also be suppressed due to the overhang of over 39 million Americans who are out of work. 

It's also telling that Facebook just launched a new group video chat product, Messenger Rooms.This looks like it's specifically designed to compete against Zoom, Skype, Google Meet and Microsoft Teams. Conveniently, Facebook’s own employees can create a video chat room and invite up to 50 people to join a video call. It will make it easier for their remote workers and also steal market share from Zoom, which has become the Covid-19 breakout success story.

A large number of companies, including Morgan Stanley, JPMorgan, Capital One, Amazon, Microsoft, Zillow and others have all announced that they’ll extend their work-from-home programs. They most likely will follow Zuckerberg and Dorsey’s lead by seeking out talent that live in lower-cost places, so they can bring down their costs. In light of the economic hit companies have taken due to the effects of Covid-19, saving money has become a top priority.

On the flip side, there is some positive news. Job seekers will have more opportunities—albeit along with greater competition—as they can apply to jobs anywhere in the United States. If you see a job advertisement for a position outside of where you reside, feel free to submit your résumé. The odds are that most companies will adopt this remote-work strategy and consider candidates from various locations. This trend will free you from being relegated to only applying to jobs within commuting distance. 

This power move by Zuckerberg could be the biggest game changer for the job market coming out of the Covid-19 pandemic.

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